35th Annual Conference

April 23-25, 2017

 

AGENDA

Date Time Event
23
Sunday
April 2017
4:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Pre-Registration Opens

23
Sunday
April 2017
5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Member Tribe Meeting/Reception

Date Time Event
24
Monday
April 2017
8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

General Session

Opening Prayer


Host Tribe Welcome

The Tuolumne Band of Me-Wuk Indians


NAFOA Welcoming Remarks

Cristina Danforth, Oneida Nation, President, NAFOA Board of Directors


Self-Determination During a Trump Presidency

The Trump administration and Congress are moving quickly acting on campaign promises of tax reform, infrastructure spending, ACA repeal and replace, and regulatory reform. Where do Indian nations stand in this new government? How can tribes hold on to and improve healthcare gains while looking to grow their economies using infrastructure, tax, and regulatory reform? Our panel will discuss pathways forward under the new administration and Congress.


Storytellers: Building the Next Generation of Leaders

NAFOA has worked for years to develop a youth leadership program that teaches life skills and professional preparedness. Part online and part experiential learning, the certificate program sets out to become a mark of distinction for those accepted and willing to take on the additional responsibility. It also promises to become an asset for those tribes and firms interested in bringing outstanding and committed youth into their workforce.

Speaker:

Cody Harjo, Education Coordinator, NAFOA


Navigating the Trump Effect on the Markets

President Trump has appointed a record number of Wall Street executives to serve in his new Administration. In addition, we have seen an early commitment to roll back Dodd-Frank regulations, reform the tax code, and spend on infrastructure. All of this has been well received by Wall Street, but what does a rising market, rising interest rates, and a reduced tax and regulatory burden mean for tribal government capital expansion and existing investments?

Speakers:

Tony Crescenzi, Executive Vice President, Portfolio Manager, PIMCO

Gary Schlossberg, Senior Economist, Wells Fargo Capital Management


Storytellers: The Orange Book - A Controversial Celebration

NAFOA assembled a dedicated Orange Book Advisory Board to take on revising the outdated Financial Management Guide for Tribal Governments. Little did we know the topics would generate so many healthy and passionate discussions on how to properly represent tribal governments when it comes to securing our rightful place among governments. The story—one of respect for our form of governance and sovereignty—has yet to be completely written. Hear our story from the person who pulled it all together.

Speakers:

Jennifer Parisien, Financial Management Policy Specialist, NAFOA

David Vaudt, Chairman, Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB)


24
Monday
April 2017
10:20 AM - 10:35 AM

Refreshment Break

Sponsored by:

 

24
Monday
April 2017
12:00 PM - 1:30 PM

Luncheon

24
Monday
April 2017
1:30 PM - 5:00 PM

Breakout Session Themes

Track 1 Theme: Governance & Economic Opportunities

Track 1 themed sessions on "Governance & Economic Opportunities" provide insight on best practices for building the legal and governance capacity of your tribe.

 

Track 2 Theme: Financial Management

Track 2 themed sessions on "Financial Management" are designed for finance department staff, emerging financial managers, and tribal administrators looking to continue their education in accounting, budgeting, and operations.

 

Track 3 Theme: Capital & Asset Management
Track 3 themed sessions on "Capital & Asset Management" are designed to help tribes identify and secure viable sources of capital to fund current and future ventures.

24
Monday
April 2017
1:30 PM - 2:45 PM

Breakout Sessions

Track 1: Building an Economic Agenda for the 115th Congress

Tax reform and infrastructure development are high priorities for the Republican controlled Congress and Administration. How can we leverage these issues to enhance our economic and government standing? What do we need to do to achieve governmental parity in tax reform and build sustainable communities through innovative capital and infrastructure programs? This facilitated discussion is designed to build a cohesive plan for congressional interaction.


Track 2: The True Cost of a Tribal Government Service

“It’s just hitting a button.” This phrase can be heard in council chambers and is used by tribal citizens without considering the true cost of providing government programs and services. Many tribal offices, charged with carrying out their programs and services, lack accurate cost information for implementation. Panelists in this session will discuss how they calculate program and activity costs, charges and administrative fees, and how they consider impacts of the indirect cost pool.

Speakers:

RaLinda Ninham-Lamberies, Assistant Chief Financial Officer Oneida Nation

Kristy VanderMolen, CPA, Assurance Director, BDO USA, LLP


Track 3: Managing & Avoiding Conflicts through Better Agreements

A well-drafted agreement can serve to define relationships and avoid conflicts down the road.  Agreements can also serve as a clear pathway to resolving conflicts when they occur. Signing a contract when little is at stake or recycling old agreements that may not reflect the current needs of a tribe may be liabilities waiting to be realized. Learn risks to avoid and core principles that should appear in any well-drafted agreement that takes into consideration tribal rights, sovereign immunity, and other proper safeguards to protect a tribe’s interest.

Speakers:

Ian Barker, Senior Managing Associate, Dentons

Wade Blackmon, Counsel, Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP 


24
Monday
April 2017
3:00 PM - 4:15 PM

Breakout Sessions

Track 1: Embracing Technology to Bring Financial Services to the Reservation

Technology is transforming the banking and financial services industry in developing nations around the world. Rural communities can access services remotely, and even make payments by phone regardless of where they are located. Financial centers can use technology to provide virtual services and “in person” meetings. Can Indian Country benefit from the use of these experimental technologies?

Speakers:

Matt Borkowski, Tribal Solutions Manager, Arctic Information Technology


Track 2: Current GASB Projects: An Open Discussion on Major Accounting Changes

GASB has taken comments on the existing financial reporting model and is gathering comments on the issue of equity ownership by governments. Both of these issues will impact tribal governments. Don’t miss the chance to interact directly with GASB and our GASAC representative on these and other changes in the works.

Moderator:

Joel Haaser, Director, BKD CPAs & Advisors

Speakers:

Roberta E. Reese, Senior Project Manager, Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB)

Tasha Repp, CPA,  Partner and Tribal & Gaming Services National Practice Leader, Moss Adams LLP, NAFOA GASAC Representative

David Vaudt, Chairman, Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB)


Track 3: Structures and Oversight – What Makes a Tribal Enterprise Successful

Good corporate governance encourages tribal enterprises to create value, provide accountability, and develop control systems to minimize risks. Inserting politics into enterprises is inevitable; however, putting the right checks and balances in place can help tribes overcome the effects of too little or too much management. Enterprises require a stable operating environment, effective free-market incentives, and autonomy of management. Tribal government-owned enterprises that have the right checks and balances in place are about four times as likely to be profitable as those that are not. Join this session to hear case studies on effective corporate structures, governance, management, and use of capital.

Speakers:

David B. Johnson, Acting Chief, Division of Capital Investment, Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development

Christine L. Swanick, Partner, Sheppard Mullin


24
Monday
April 2017
4:15 PM - 5:30 PM

Breakout Sessions

Track 1: Community Planning for Sustainable Development

Carefully thinking through land use and government infrastructure such as telecommunications, roads, and water can make a significant difference for the quality of life for the entire tribal community, not to mention save on future building, financing, and expansion costs. A tribe’s future expansion and growth may depend on forward thinking ideas like creating utilities for energy and telecommunications instead of simply accessing a service for a single use. Engage our expert panelists on how to plan sustainable communities through smart development.

Speakers:

Dr. Michael Marchand, Chairman, Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation 


Track 2: Contract Support Cost (CSC) Changes – What Your Tribe Needs to Know

The Department of the Interior and the Indian Health Service have finalized changes to their respective contract support cost manuals. The panelists will review these changes and discuss their impacts to tribal governments, including how the changes will impact both direct and indirect funding. They will also provide helpful recommendations on how to maximize funding under the new guidance.

Moderator:

James Nichols, Senior Attorney, Dorsey & Whitney LLP

Speakers:

Brian Deveau, CPA, Partner, Moss Adams LLP

Steve Osborne, Partner, Hobbs, Straus, Dean & Walker, LLP


Track 3: Are Your Investments Managing You?

How many departments are managing tribal assets and are they all working together to manage risk and maximize returns? An overall investment plan for the entire tribal government can reduce risk, save money, and cut back on maverick investments that can damage a tribe’s entire holdings. A tribal government investment plan or prudent investor act, similar to states, can ensure a cohesive strategy across all departments and money managers. Learn how to develop a comprehensive plan that puts the tribe first and ensures that costs and risks stay manageable.

Moderator:

Matthew D. Gelfand, Managing Director, Rockefeller & Co.

Speakers:

John Barry, Managing Partner, Tribal Capital Markets, LLC, Morongo Band of Mission Indians

Stephanie Bryan, Tribal Chair, Poarch Band of Creek Indians

Matthew D. Gelfand, Managing Director, Rockefeller & Co.

Brad H. Hyde, Director, PNC Capital Advisors, LLC, VP, PNC Institutional Asset Management

 

  


24
Monday
April 2017
5:30 PM - 7:30 PM

President's Reception

Date Time Event
25
Tuesday
April 2017
7:00 AM - 8:30 AM

Women's Leadership Breakfast (Optional)

This breakfast will provide a forum for women tribal leaders and others in key tribal finance positions to exchange ideas, share experiences, and inspire each other to achieve their goals.

Sponsored by:

Sheppard Mullin, TFA Capital, and Wells Fargo

25
Tuesday
April 2017
8:30 AM - 10:55 AM

General Session

Opening Prayer


Building Leadership and Professional Skills – An Academic Approach

NAFOA and Arizona State University’s (ASU) American Indian Policy Institute (AIPI) are building on their existing partnership to develop a leadership development course called the Tribal Economic Leadership (TEL) Program. This innovative executive education program will leverage ASU’s extensive resources, NAFOA’s expertise, and firsthand experiences from tribal leaders to provide a unique and cutting-edge experience for elected and appointed officials.

Speaker:

Dr. Traci L. Morris, Director, American Indian Policy Institute, Arizona State University


NAFOA Board Campaign Speeches

NAFOA is hosting elections for three of the five board positions in the organization. This year we will hear from candidates wishing to hold the First Vice President, Treasurer, and Secretary positions on the board.  


Evaluating the Role of Financial Firms in Indian Country

The relationship between financial institutions and tribal governments, in many ways, has never been stronger or more productive for both parties. However, it has become apparent that the financial services firms that serve Indian Country and public interests need to consider their broad community, social, and environmental impact beyond a specific client interest. Adding to this dynamic are tribal citizens who are prompting leadership to ensure their existing or potential financial partners have policies in place that support tribal communities, tribal values, and respect cultural and sacred sites. Simply put, tribes want to know that the institutions that are serving Indian Country are giving back to Indian Country.

Join the facilitated discussion on the changing role of financial firms in Indian Country. Are financial firms ensuring sustainable and culturally appropriate investing in projects that require consideration of tribal values? Do they have corporate giving and Native hiring practices that are making a difference?

Speakers:

David Archambault II, Chairman, Standing Rock Sioux Tribe 

Tara Sweeney, Executive Vice President of External Affairs, Arctic Slope Regional Corporation (ASRC)


General Welfare Exclusion and Tax Roundtable: Implementation & Policy Discussion

The Treasury-Tribal Advisory Committee (TTAC) is charged with hearing concerns regarding tax issues in Indian Country and helping to implement certain provisions from the Tribal General Welfare Law. Since passing, tribes have implemented general welfare programs in many different ways and with broad discretion. It may be time to share best practices on documentation, eligible programs, tax or financial issues that may have arisen from income reporting by Social Security or child support enforcement. Members of the TTAC and the Department of Treasury will be on hand to facilitate the discussion on general welfare issues

Speakers:

Beverly Ortega Babers, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Management and Budget, Point of Contact for Tribal Consultation, U.S. Treasury Department

Lacey Horn, Treasurer, Cherokee Nation.

Christie Jacobs, Director of Indian Tribal Governments, Internal Revenue Service (IRS)

Eugene Magnuson, Tribal Council Treasurer, Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians


25
Tuesday
April 2017
10:55 AM - 11:10 AM

Refreshment Break

25
Tuesday
April 2017
11:10 AM - 12:25 PM

Breakout Sessions

Track 1: Partnering for Community Development

Tribal governments often use the long-standing and valuable partnership with the Department of the Interior for program and community support. However, economic development and self-determination often depends on reaching out beyond the traditional partners. Our diverse panel will discuss the importance of building good partnerships and how to work around those partnerships that may not be willing to build a mutually beneficial partnership.


Track 2: Building an Effective Process for Managing Records

Tribal Governments have broad responsibilities and programs that continue to expand the type and number of records that need to be managed. Going paperless or moving to the cloud sounds easy, but there still needs to be an underlying process for managing records and, just as important, destroying records. Learn about the various rules and regulations around what types of records need to be kept and for how long. Join the conversation to discuss good processes and systems, record security and redundancy, and what privileges apply to sovereigns when records are stored off-reservation.

Speakers:

Lisa Grant, Records & Information Management Specialist, Pacific Region, OST, U.S. Department of the Interior

Brian Shull, CPA, Principal, Director of Tribal Services, CliftonLarsonAllen


Track 3: Can Your Portfolio Survive the Market Volatility?

Global economic uncertainty, along with changes in fiscal policy at home, has the potential to dramatically increase stock and bond market volatility. The year started with the market largely ignoring this uncertainty, but how long can that last and are you prepared to either take advantage of market changes or protect assets from market changes? This panel will discuss their expert views on designing a portfolio that considers the uncertainty and volatility in the markets.

Speakers:

Jenna Ara, Director, GoldenTree Asset Management LLP

Garth Flint, CEO, Founder, Beacon Pointe Advisors

Michael Starratt, Managing Director – Wealth Management, Global Institutional Consultant, Merrill Lynch


25
Tuesday
April 2017
12:30 PM - 2:00 PM

10th Annual Leadership Awards Luncheon

The 10th Annual Leadership Awards Luncheon honors tribal leaders and finance professionals for their outstanding contributions to improving economic conditions in Indian Country, as well as an innovative education program and business deal.

Presentation of Awards

Education Program of the Year

Deal of the Year

Executive of the Year

Tribal Leader of the Year

25
Tuesday
April 2017
2:00 PM - 3:15 PM

Breakout Sessions

Track 1: Preparing for Infrastructure Investment – P3’s, Tax Credits, and Subsidies

The Trump administration and Congress are developing an infrastructure spending plan that will rely on three core sources of funding – public-private partnerships, tax credit pools, and direct spending. Some tribes may be familiar with New Markets Tax Credits and Low Income Housing Tax Credits, which have brought over $1 billion to Indian Country over the past two decades. However, the proposed infrastructure plans will cover broad types of projects, require different partners, and include government use of credits. Is your tribe prepared, and do you have the right partners in place to take advantage of these different funding streams?

Moderator:

Richard Helde, Of Counsel, Dorsey & Whitney LLP

Speakers:

John Hosman, Partner, FS Advisors, Inc.

Chris Phillips, Associate General Counsel, The Chickasaw Nation Department of Commerce


Track 2: Orange Book: Timely Topics and Continuing Challenges

The Orange Book Team spent years developing the new Financial Management Guide for Tribal Governments. The tribal form of government deserves to be both recognized and treated fairly among the family of governments. While the accomplishment of publishing the book is noteworthy in moving toward that goal, there were a number of issues raised while writing the book that deserve further discussion and clarification. Join some of the authors in a discussion clarifying subject matter and defining continuing issues.

Speakers:

Suresh Geer, Executive Director of Finance, Seminole Tribe of Florida

Kristy VanderMolen, CPA, Assurance Director, BDO USA, LLP

Corrine Wilson, CPA, Principal/National Tribal Practice, REDW LLC

 


Track 3: Who Is Responsible for Your Tribal Retirement Plan Investments?

The Trump administration moved quickly to roll back the Department of Labor’s so-called fiduciary rule requiring advisors to act in the best interests of their clients. This is a good time to understand your tribe’s retirement and pension obligations and your personal liabilities. We will also examine fee structures that may be eroding your participants’ potential savings and costing the tribe millions in lost investment over the life of the plan. 

Speakers:

Jean Ackerman, Regional Director, US Department of Labor, Employee Benefits Security Administration, San Francisco Regional Office

Allan Henriques, President, Chief Executive Officer & Chief Compliance Officer, Smart Investor

Jennifer L. Vail, Chief Investment Officer, Institutional & Corporate Trust, U.S. Bank Wealth Management


25
Tuesday
April 2017
3:15 PM - 3:30 PM

Refreshment Break

25
Tuesday
April 2017
3:30 PM - 4:45 PM

Breakout Sessions

Track 1: Bank Secrecy Act: Are You at Risk?

The Bank Secrecy Act (BSA) was enacted to help in the investigation of money laundering, tax evasion, and other criminal activity. The BSA is a combination of various statutes that require cash handling operations to record and retain certain records as well as report certain financial transactions to the federal government. This session will reinforce NAFOA’s message about the importance of having effective operational and compliance processes in place. Topics to be discussed include: BSA regulatory requirements for casinos, internal compliance, civil enforcement actions, the BSA examination process, money laundering, and example criminal cases for your tribe to avoid.

Speakers:

Christopher Giovino, Managing Director, Forensic Analysis and Crime Claims, Asset and BI  Valuation, Cyber Evaluation Risk Quantification, Aon Risk Solutions

Alan F. Gordon, SVP & Co-Director Gaming Industries Global Commercial Banking, Bank of America Merrill Lynch

 


Track 2: Best Practices to Plan for an Efficient Audit

A successful audit includes an efficient audit. Proper planning can minimize time required by the auditors to be onsite and can facilitate timely submission of financial information (e.g. tribal council and members, National Indian Gaming Commission, debt covenant compliance, regulatory filings, etc.). This session will explore common causes of inefficient audits, why you should hold a planning meeting and who should be involved within the tribe, tips on documenting unique and complex transactions that will prevent headaches later, and what you can do to avoid audit adjustments.

Moderator:

Chris Tyhurst, CPA, REDW Principal, National Practice Leader – Tribal Services

Speakers:

Francisco J. Colon, CPA, CFE & CGMA, Partner, MGO, LLP

Pete Magee, CPA, Accufund


Track 3: The Role of Banks and Private Capital in CDFI Investing

Native CDFIs have played a significant role over the past decade in building local economies through small business lending, personal financial services, and moving citizens toward homeownership. Banks and private capital play a key role in supporting these growing services through grants and matching loans. This facilitated discussion will focus on how banks and private investments have made a difference and how they can do more to support the success already taking place in tribal communities. 

Speakers:

Shane Jett, Executive Director/CEO, Citizen Potawatomi Community Development Corporation (CPCDC)

John Stensgar, Chairman of the Board of Directors of NNDF (Northwest Native Development Fund)


25
Tuesday
April 2017
5:30 PM - 10:30 PM

Closing Reception/Giants Baseball Game