AGENDA

Date

Time

Event

Date

Time

Event

Monday, April 18 7:00 AM - 8:30 AM

Breakfast Buffet

Monday, April 18 12:15 PM - 1:45 PM

Luncheon

Luncheon Blessing & Culture Sharing

St. Peter Indian Mission Junior High School Students 


Monday, April 18 2:45 PM - 3:00 PM

Refreshment Break

Monday, April 18 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Breakout Sessions

Track 1: Diversify Revenues through the Rights-of-Way, Land Leasing and Taxation

Tribal governments rely on a broad range of revenue sources to fund government services, including federal grants and contracts, issuing debt, and economic development. Often economic development is focused on current revenues but not nearly enough on factors that can drive additional revenues such as income from new rights-of-way land leasing, taxes on sales, utilities, gas, tobacco, and resort amenities. Panelists will explore ways to improve and optimize new potential revenue streams from the new rights-of-way land leasing regulations and tax jurisdiction.
Moderator:
David Bean, Council Member, Puyallup Tribe of Indians

Speakers:
Wade T. Blackmon, Counsel, Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP 

Stephen T. LeCuyer, Office of the Tribal Attorney, Swinomish Indian Tribal Community
Wendy Pearson, Attorney, Pearson Law Offices, P.S.
Mary Streitz, Partner, Dorsey & Whitney LLP


Track 2: Subcontracting and Subrecipient Monitoring: Why Tribes Need to Pay Attention

Subcontracting and sub recipient pass-throughs come with additional responsibilities to the tribe. When is a contractor considered a subrecipient? The new OMB Uniform Guidance specifically addresses sub recipient and vendor/contractor determinations and requirements for pass-through entities for grants. Tribes should also pay attention to subcontracting limitations under 8(a) contracts. Tribal governments should ensure they understand the differences and address issues associated with subrecipient and subcontracting monitoring. Panelists will discuss the impact changes have on monitoring, including determinations of vendor vs. subrecipient, pass-through responsibilities, limitation guides, risk assessments, and auditor considerations.

Moderator:

Heather Lane Shaffer, Manager, KPMG LLP

 

Speakers:
Larry Barton, CFO, Oneida Tribe of Indians of WI

Kirk Francis, Chief, Penobscot Nation

Scott Huebert, CPA, Senior Manager in Tribal Accounting Services, Finley & Cook, P.L.L.C.


Track 3: Managing Contract and Project Risks in Tribal Governments to Prevent Financial Loss

Risk management at tribal governments is not a new concept. What is new is the need to integrate risk management into the strategic and decision making processes with project management and contracting across tribal departments and enterprises. This session will provide leadership with an overview of enterprise risk management and will focus on government contracting, practice pointers, risk transfer, indemnity, insurance coverages available to prevent an impact of financial loss.

Moderator:

Derek Valdo, Chief Executive Officer, AMERIND Risk

 

Speakers:

Michael Canfield, President/CEO, Indian Pueblo Cultural Center, Inc. & Indian Pueblos Marketing, Inc.

Skip Durocher, Partner, Dorsey & Whitney LLP

Glen Gobin, Vice Chairman, Tulalip Tribes

Patrick Jewell, Assistant Vice President, Lead Consultant, Alliant Specialty Insurance Services/Tribal First


Monday, April 18 4:05 PM - 5:05 PM

Breakout Sessions

Track 1: Balancing Economic Development from Government Oversight

Despite recent progress in tribes moving toward self-determination through economic development, impediments continue to prevent tribal nations from realizing their true economic potential. Tribal governments are attempting to balance the role of governing with their role as business and investment oversight and of supervision and federal policies have not evolved to support self-determination> This includes trust management interference at the Office of the Special Trustee, the lack of parity between private and trust land energy development, comprehensive and sweeping environmental regulations, the consistent failure to favor tribal interests over state and local interests or federal agency conflicts of interest, and unnecessary appraisals. All of these factors restrict Indian country from realizing economic sovereignty. This session will examine effective tribal structures and how the tribal determination of trust management, the consolidation of the cross-agency project approval process, the removal of constraining environmental regulations, and the support of tribal interests over federal, state, and local interests can remove barriers to enable tribal nations to effectively build economic independence.

Moderator:

Steve Stallings, Council Member, Rincon Band of Luiseño Indians

 

Speakers:

Daniel Jordan, Self-Governance Coordinator, Hoopa Valley Tribe

Michael Marchand, Vice Chairman, The Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation

Kay Rhoads, Principal Chief, Sac and Fox Nation


Track 2: Internal Controls and Open Technology: Why You Should Be Worried

Almost every day you hear about new advances in financial technology to streamline processes at tribes. Have you ever wondered how this new technology, for example “cloud storage” and web-based software, affects internal controls? Information technology (IT) touches all aspects of tribal government financial operations from payroll to accounting systems to banking to gaming and other economic development activities. IT should not be considered a separate and distinct area of internal controls and should be reviewed in conjunction with designing, maintaining, and evaluating staff controls. This session will address potential shortcoming through IT control activities and cyber liability risk to correspond with the tribal government’s current policies.

Moderator:

Kris Nixon, CPA, Manager, Tribal Services, CliftonLarsonAllen

 

Speakers:

Matt Borkowski, Senior Consultant & Tribal ERP Lead, Arctic Information Technology

Laura Jehl, Partner & Co-Chair, Privacy and Data Security Practice, Sheppard Mullin Richter & Hampton LLP

Antony Kim, Partner, Global Co-Chair Cyber & Data Privacy, Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP

Donald Molloy, First Vice President, Alliant Specialty Insurance Services/Tribal First


Track 3: Finance Your Tribe’s Project Using Outside Capital

In this session, financing experts will explore access to capital options and strategies that work best in today’s market to secure funding for government operations, economic development, and energy projects. Panelists will discuss how to secure outside capital, starting with Tribal Economic Development bonds, including the new draw-down option which allows tribes is issue debt in phases over time rather than drawn down all at once. Speakers will also review private capital options that partner with federal programs through the US Department of Agriculture, particularly from the Rural Initiative, the Department of Treasury’s New Markets Tax Credits program, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs’ Loan Guarantee Program.

Moderator:
John Hosman
, Partner, FS Advisors, Inc.


Speakers:

Sam Cohen, ‎Government Affairs and Legal Officer, Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians
Phil Glynn, Vice President, Economic Development, Travois
Alan Gordon, Senior Vice President & Senior Gaming Relationship Manager, Bank of America Merrill Lynch
Clay Vanderpool, Vice President, Native American Gaming & Finance, PNC Bank


Date

Time

Event

Tuesday, April 19 7:00 AM - 8:30 AM

Breakfast Buffet

Tuesday, April 19 10:50 AM - 11:00 AM

Refreshment Break

Tuesday, April 19 12:15 PM - 1:45 PM

9th Annual Leadership Awards Luncheon

The 9th Annual Leadership Awards Luncheon honors tribal leaders and finance professionals for their outstanding contributions to improving economic conditions in Indian Country, as well as an innovative education program and business deal.

Presentation of Awards

Education Program of the Year

Deal of the Year

Executive of the Year

Tribal Leader of the Year

Luncheon Blessing & Culture Sharing

Robert Stone, Community Elder and District 5 Council Representative