January 30: 5 Things You Need to Know This Week

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Email
Photo of the Week: Did you know – NAFOA serves as a technical advisor to the Treasury Tribal Advisory Committee? Learn more about the TTAC and NAFOA’s role on our new TTAC webpage.

1. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT: DEADLINE EXTENDED: LEADING PEOPLE AND INVESTING TO BUILD SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES

The deadline for Leading People and Investing to Build Sustainable Communities (LPIBSC) has been extended to January 31! Applications are due by 11:59 pm Alaska Time. 

COST OF PROGRAM: 
$3,000*
(Payment is due upon acceptance into the program; applicants will be notified)
The program fee covers tuition, books, case materials, accommodations, and most meals. 
*NAFOA has limited need-based funding available for selected eligible participants.

LOCATION & ACCOMMODATIONS: 
Harvard Business School Campus, Boston, MA 
Program participants are encouraged to stay in the HBS residences and the cost of the stay is included in the cost of the program.

PROGRAM DATES: 
May 8-12, 2023
All program sessions are mandatory. To receive the most out of the program, group meetings outside of these hours are also required and mandatory for participants to attend.


2. FUNDING OPPORTUNITY: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TO ANNOUNCE FUNDING OPPORTUNITY FOR CLEAN ENERGY TECHNOLOGY DEPLOYMENT ON TRIBAL LANDS

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (Office of Indian Energy) issued a Notice of Intent (NOI) to release a $50 million Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) this spring to support clean energy technology deployment on tribal lands. Awards from this planned FOA are anticipated to range from $100,000 to $2.5 million or from $250,000 to $5 million, depending on the Area of Interest.

Through this planned FOA, the Office of Indian Energy intends to solicit applications from Indian Tribes, which include Alaska Native Regional Corporations and Village Corporations, Intertribal Organizations, and Tribal Energy Development Organizations, to:
 

  1. Install clean energy generating system(s) and/or energy efficiency measure(s) for tribal building(s); or,
  2. Deploy community-scale clean energy generating system(s) or energy storage on tribal lands; or,
  3. Install integrated energy system(s) for autonomous operation (independent of the traditional centralized electric power grid) to power a single or multiple essential tribal buildings during emergency situations or for tribal community resilience; or,
  4. Power unelectrified tribal buildings.

3. FOR NATIVE STUDENTS: COLLEGE FUND SCHOLARSHIP KICK-OFF EVENT

The American Indian College Fund’s (College Fund) scholarship season opens on February 1. Hundreds of scholarships are available for all areas of study under the Full Circle Scholarship Program, and students attending tribal colleges and universities can receive additional scholarship support with the program. Any Native American U.S. citizen who is an enrolled member, or descendant of an enrolled member of a state or federally recognized tribe may apply. Applicants must also have a minimum 2.0 grade point average and plan to enroll as a full-time student at a nonprofit, accredited college or university.

To help students understand the application process and the many scholarships available to them, the College Fund is hosting a free scholarship kick-off webinar at 6:00 p.m. MST on February 1. Prizes will also be awarded at the event.


4. INTERESTING READS: NATIVE AMERICANS HAVE FEWER OPPORTUNITIES TO WORK REMOTELY

During the COVID-19 pandemic, articles on remote work have been anything but remote. Considerable attention has gone to the potential benefits and costs of remote work for employers and employees. But when researchers Matthew Gregg and Robert Maxim dug into new data from the Current Population Survey, they hit on an aspect of the remote work economy that’s received less attention: the involvement of Native American workers in the remote work revolution. In a report for the Brookings Institution, the researchers detailed how more than any other group, American Indian and Alaska Native workers are less likely to work remotely.

Center for Indian Country Development (CICD) writer and analyst Caryn Mohr sat down with the researchers to discuss what they found, why their findings matter, and what we can do to address the gap. With Caryn and Matt at their office in Minnesota and Rob joining from a family home in Massachusetts, the interview was conducted—you guessed it—remotely.

From: Center for Indian Country Development


5. JOBS: NANSEMOND INDIAN NATION IS SEEKING STAFF ACCOUNTANT

Under the supervision, direction, and oversight of the Finance Director and Tribal Administrator, the Staff Accountant will be responsible for assisting with the day-to-day financial-related activities of the Nation.

A successful candidate will possess the following preferred Qualifications:

  • Bachelor’s Degree from an accredited college or university with major coursework in Accounting with three (3) years of experience in a similar capacity for an Indian tribal or public government; or
  • Associate’s Degree in Accounting with five (5) or more year’s progressive experience in finance or accounting in an Indian tribal or public government; or
  • An acceptable combination of education and experience that in the Nation’s discretion, equates to the preferred qualifications.

Get NAFOA’s 5 Things You Need to Know This Week in your inbox at the start of each week. Subscribe here.

Related

NAFOA Announces Former Yurok Tribal Leader Susan Masten As Interim Executive Director

NAFOA, founded as the Native American Finance Officers Association, names former Yurok Tribal Leader Susan Masten as its interim executive director effective today, June 1, 2023. She was appointed to the position by the NAFOA Board of Directors. As interim executive director, Masten will be responsible for managing the day-to-day operations of the organization, as well as leading its strategic direction.

Read More »
Scroll to Top
Skip to content